CLP training course 2013. Credit; CLP

Total Tree Call; new small grant opportunity for tree conservationists

Posted on by Victoria Price
In an innovative move designed to promote tree-specific conservation leaders, the Global Trees Campaign (GTC) is joining forces with the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP) to support one of its 2017 Future Conservationist Awards.

 

The need to conserve threatened species and habitats has never been more urgent. And there is a correspondingly urgent need for the conservation sector itself to  support early career conservationists, thereby enabling these people to become leaders and advocates who achieve positive outcomes for biodiversity

The plight of the world’s threatened trees is a particular cause for concern. With over 1,850 species already listed as Critically Endangered, many trees are in imminent danger of extinction. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that very few practitioners focus on tree species conservation. Historically, CLP has supported a number of tree-specific conservation projects, including work on three species endemic to India’s Western Ghats that led to the discovery of a new species of evergreen tree, and the now globally renowned, award-winning Mpingo Conservation & Development Initiative.

CLP Alumni, Jaspar Makala, at work for the Mpingo Conservation & Development Initiative. The mpingo project has been previously funded by both GTC and CLP. Credit: Mpingo Conservation & Development Initiative

CLP Alumni, Jaspar Makala, at work for the Mpingo Conservation & Development Initiative. The mpingo project has been previously funded by both GTC and CLP. Credit: Mpingo Conservation & Development Initiative

The Award

CLP Future Conservationist Awards offer funding of US$12,500 to teams of early-career conservationists to conduct projects on species that are categorised as Data Deficient, Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. Projects must take place in one of 22 eligible countries*, be led (or co-led) by a national of one of these countries, involve a minimum of three people and last no more than 12 months. This year, buttressed by GTC support, one of these awards will be ring-fenced specifically for a project team focusing on a tree species that falls into one of the above categories.

From now until the end of November 2016, CLP is accepting applications from early-career conservationists, offering them the opportunity to join a growing network of leaders engaged in advancing scientific knowledge, bringing about important changes in human behaviour and delivering measurable results that contribute to more effective conservation and management of our natural world.

In addition to providing project funding, CLP will invite one member of each award-winning team, all expenses paid, to an international training course where they will learn about a range of conservation management and leadership topics as well as sharing knowledge and experiences with other early-career conservationists. This training course helps award winners to deliver their CLP projects and has also been credited with furthering participants’ career progression. It is a rewarding and life-changing experience!

Magnolia sinostellata, an Endangered tree found in China. Less than 1,500 mature individuals are thought to exist. Credit; Professor Shouzhou Zhang Fairylake Botanic Garden

Magnolia sinostellata, an Endangered tree found in China. Less than 1,500 mature individuals are thought to exist. Credit; Professor Shouzhou Zhang Fairylake Botanic Garden

How to get involved

For more information about the 2017 Team Awards, including the eligibility criteria, applications forms and Frequently Asked Questions, visit the CLP website.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to request support from the Global Trees Campaign team in writing their application, and a number of CLP Ambassadors (all of them previous award winners) are also on hand to provide advice. This year’s list of ambassadors includes a tree specialist, who secured a CLP award championing threatened trees in 2013. Ambassador support has proved very beneficial in the past, as this blog by one recent winner demonstrates!

If you are working on a threatened tree species that you think may be eligible for CLP funding, contact the GTC team (globaltrees@fauna-flora.org), who will be able to provide support and guidance in developing your application. Please ensure your requests for feedback are submitted by 24th November 2016. The deadline for applications is Monday 28th November 2016.

*Algeria, Angola, Azerbaijan, Brazil, China, Egypt, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Malaysia, Mexico, Mozambique, Oman, South Africa, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam

Written by Victoria Price

Victoria works as a Programme Officer at Fauna & Flora International. In her role she provides support to the Global Trees Campaign and is responsible for the delivery of several field projects including Central Asia & Madagascar.

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