Planning conservation action for world’s threatened trees

Conservation problem
There is a need to significantly scale up the number of tree species with conservation plans to ensure effective action on the ground.
Project goal
To use data generated by the Global Tree Assessment to deliver conservation planning exercises at the national scale.

Why this project?

The State of the World’s Trees report has found that 30% of all tree species are threatened with extinction. To ensure that no tree species goes extinct, multi-species conservation approaches are urgently needed. IUCN Red List Assessments provide vital information for the planning process such as distribution data and information on threats and conservation actions needed. Using data generated by the Global Tree Assessment (GTA), and following the IUCN SSC Conservation Planning Specialist Group’s ASSES – PLAN – ACT model, this project will move more species into planning stage through the establishment of national-level programmes.

What are we doing?

We are establishing national programmes for threatened trees in priority countries using the following approach as a guide:

  • Complete conservation assessments (mandate of the GTA)
  • Conduct stakeholder analysis to identify key partners to be engaged in the planning process
  • Run conservation planning workshops
  • Write up workshop report and review
  • Develop National Conservation Action Plans
  • Establish national threatened tree consortium
  • Initiate priority actions, including working with partners to build capacity and support fundraising
  • Tracking conservation actions
Kenyan Conservation Planning online workshop

Kenyan Conservation Planning online workshop

Key achievements

A national programme has been initiated in Kenya, where the conservation planning work led to the engagement of an enthusiastic group of partners. This group has now formed a national conservation consortium for trees, developed a National Conservation Action plan for Kenya’s threatened trees and is initiating conservation actions in priority sites and for priority species.

Herbert Ongubo planning with partners

Herbert Ongubo planning with partners

Contact details

For more information on this project, please contact Yvette.harvey-brown@bgci.org.

Did you know?

The giant redwood is the biggest tree in the world. The biggest individual tree is named ‘General Sherman’ and has a circumference near the ground of 31.1m.